The Work-from-home Tug Of War

Work from home moms face a juggling act too

<img src='http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/130731210437-01-work-from-home-horizontal-gallery.jpg' width='200px' alt='1. Set a schedule: To work effectively from home, map out your schedule and create a prioritized “To Do” list the night before, says Holly Reisem Hanna, founder of The Work at Home Woman. “That way when you sit down to work, you’ll know exactly what needs to be done.”‘ style=’float:left;padding:5px’ />

Patti McCreary, with her son Tyler Mebust, 3, works out of her San Diego-area home for a company based in New York. Telecommuting allows her to spend more time with her three official website young children. (Photo: Robert Hanashiro, USA TODAY) The loved one is never more cherished than when threatened, and so it’s been a nervous fortnight for many telecommuters since Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer announced plans to corral her telecommuters like cattle wandering the North 40. REPORT: VPN logs led to Yahoo telecommute ban It’s true that Yahoo denied making any broad statement about the practice; that most telecommuters can distinguish their situation from that of their counterparts at Yahoo and Best Buy, another struggling company that’s tightening its telecommuting policy; that many employers have too much invested in telecommuting to go back now. But the Yahoo affair has forced us to consider the downside of a work style that has been hailed as the solution to everything from air pollution to the dog’s need for an afternoon walk. Its benefits are modest but numerous. I don’t see it going away. Ravi Shankar Gajendran Ravi Shankar Gajendran, a University of Illinois business professor who’s spent years studying telecommuting, says the furor “illustrates a fundamental tension about telecommuting: Is it a business strategy, or some sort of employee right, like health insurance?” Translation: Is telecommuting good for employer or employee? Both, Gajendran says. “Its benefits are modest but numerous. I don’t see it going away.” Last month, Mayer said she would end Yahoo’s work-at-home policy to foster collaboration and innovation by bringing employees physically together All hands on deck! Mayer, who joined Yahoo from Google last year, apparently was dismayed by the vacant parking spaces and cubicles at Yahoo headquarters, and by a check of VPN logs that reportedly showed a decided lack of remote worker engagement.
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How to keep ‘work from home’ employees accountable—without spying

Or is it a mom, possibly dressed in yoga pants, booting up her computer from the confines of her own home? I bet many of you would pick the former — the woman who works outside the house. I admit I tend to have that image in mind whenever I write about the juggling act facing working moms. But each time I do that, I am leaving out the women who work from home who face their own unique work-life balance challenges. (According to a recent Stanford University study , about 10% of American workers now regularly work from home.) Take the case of Lela Davidson, whose children are 13 and 15 and who has been working from home as a published author, freelance writer and blogger since her children were in elementary school. Recently, she has been recruited for a few jobs, which would require her to work in an office.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cnn.com/2013/08/03/living/parents-work-from-home-moms/index.html

Mairssa Mayer Yahoo

Im a big believer in the ROWE [Results Only Work Environment] movement. Its all about treating your staff like adults and allowing them to manage their own time, says Ben Eubanks, the HR manager for Pinnacle Solutions, a 70-person engineering and training service provider based in Huntsville, Alabama. Owing to its work as a government contractor, Pinnacle Solutions currently manages more employees located outside its home office than based in it, but Eubanks says that Pinnacle doesnt use any specific tech products to make sure that theyre getting their work done. We have a strict hiring process, and we screen rigorously to find people who meet our core values, which we communicate early and often. A couple of times, we have run into people who cant handle the freedompeople who want to goof off instead of working. But we can tell when theyre not meeting deadlines, and we get the process started to find someone else who can, Eubanks says.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.pcworld.com/article/2032004/how-to-keep-work-from-home-employees-accountable-without-spying.html

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